Welcome to the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

Today’s challenges – Tomorrow's research and teaching

The 21st century faces numerous challenges: global warming, population explosion, food security and dwindling fossil fuel reserves are the crises of our time. Addressing these challenges will require cutting-edge research – both fundamental and applied. As a discipline encompassing this entire spectrum of issues, from food production to the supply of biogenetic raw materials through to the preservation of livable environments, the life sciences will play a leading role in these efforts.

News

Bioengineered livers mimic natural development: Scientists discover that three-dimensional liver buds grown in a dish from stem cells mimic the molecular signatures observed during the natural development of human liver

The treatment of liver disease in the final stage is the liver transplantation. But the number of donated livers is limited. A main goal of regenerative medicine is therefore to produce human tissues that form functioning three-dimensional liver diverticuli. (Photo: Fotolia/Yodiyim)

How do cells work together and use their genome to develop into human liver tissue? An international research team from the Max Planck Institute, headed by Prof. Barbara Treutlein from the Technical University of Munich (TUM),...[more]


Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered

When fat reacts with glowing coal at a barbecue, a substance chemists call benzopyrene is created. It is a widespread environmental toxin that can cause cancer in humans. (Photo: Fotolia/Dederer)

Summertime is barbecue time. However, when fat reacts with glowing coal, a substance chemists call benzopyrene is created. It is a widespread environmental toxin that can cause cancer in humans. Since buildings were heated with...[more]


How grassland management without the loss of species works: Conflict between yield maximization and species conservation in agriculture appears reconcilable

The pumpkin spider is one of the species observed for the study. Their name points to the yellowish-green backbones, which reminds of a pumpkin. (Foto: Charlesjsharp Sharp Photography /Creative-Commons-Lizenz CC BY-SA 3.0)

The intensive management of grasslands is bad for biodiversity. However, a study by the Terrestrial Ecology Research Group at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has brought a ray of hope: If different forms of management...[more]


22.06.2017

How bile duct cancer develops and how it can be prevented

A liver - an organ which is essential for life (Foto: Fotolia / PIC4U)

What promotes the development of bile duct cancer in the liver? Are these factors different from those that are responsible for the much more common hepatocellular carcinomas? Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center...[more]


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