Welcome to the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

Today’s challenges – Tomorrow's research and teaching

The 21st century faces numerous challenges: global warming, population explosion, food security and dwindling fossil fuel reserves are the crises of our time. Addressing these challenges will require cutting-edge research – both fundamental and applied. As a discipline encompassing this entire spectrum of issues, from food production to the supply of biogenetic raw materials through to the preservation of livable environments, the life sciences will play a leading role in these efforts.

News

22.06.2017

How bile duct cancer develops and how it can be prevented

A liver - an organ which is essential for life (Foto: Fotolia / PIC4U)

What promotes the development of bile duct cancer in the liver? Are these factors different from those that are responsible for the much more common hepatocellular carcinomas? Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center...[more]


02.06.2017

Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fields: What are the incentives for Taiwan's farmers to produce in a more environmentally friendly manner?

The authors decided to collect their data from rice farmers, because rice is one of the most important staple foods worldwide. (Foto: Fotolia/ ivychuang1101)

Money isn't always everything: Taiwanese rice farmers are willing to produce in a more environmentally friendly fashion if this would earn them an eco-label for their products. For such a label, they are even prepared to accept...[more]


13.04.2017

Study shows link between zinc levels and cardiac health: Zinc supply affects cardiac health

Due to its high metabolic activity, the scientists looking into the effects of zinc deprivation have focused on studying the heart muscle. (image: 7activestudio/ iStock)

In addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle. When oxidative stress occurs, it may be due to a shortage of zinc, which can be determined by examining the heart muscle....[more]


New DFG research unit for TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

Prof. Kay Schneitz, Associate Professor of Plant Developmental Biology at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan (Photo: Schneitz Lab / TUM)

The Technical University of Munich (TUM) successfully participates in a new research unit in the molecular and digital life sciences. Prof. Kay Schneitz, Associate Professor of Plant Developmental Biology at the TUM School of...[more]


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