Welcome to the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

Today’s challenges – Tomorrow's research and teaching

The 21st century faces numerous challenges: global warming, population explosion, food security and dwindling fossil fuel reserves are the crises of our time. Addressing these challenges will require cutting-edge research – both fundamental and applied. As a discipline encompassing this entire spectrum of issues, from food production to the supply of biogenetic raw materials through to the preservation of livable environments, the life sciences will play a leading role in these efforts.

News

Cascade utilisation is also positive for wood: Exergy Analysis Confirms Advantages of Closed-Loop Recycling of Wood

In cascade use, wood is used much more efficiently with a quota of 46 percent than in simple use. (Photo: R. Rosin / TUM)

Another ten years — that is approximately how long sustainable forestry will be able to satisfy the continuously growing demand for wood. In Germany and Europe, new concepts are therefore being discussed for more responsible and...[more]


Versatile cancer drugs: Study on the interaction of about half of human cancer inhibitors

In more than 6000 hours of mass spectrometry, the international research team analyzed the interaction of 243 clinically proven inhibitors with hundreds of kinases. (Picture: ediundsepp/ Kuester)

Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich...[more]


Loss of species destroys ecosystems: The "Jena Experiment" – 15 years of biodiversity research in review

Due to its breadth, the Jena experiment proves for the first time that a loss of biodiversity has negative consequences for many individual components and processes in ecosystems. (Photo: The Jena Experiment)

How serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the "Jena Experiment" was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments...[more]


Optimizing wheat cultivation – by comparing genomes with natural ancestors

The decoding of the complex genome sequence lay the foundation for targeted breeding and consequently improved wheat quality. (Photo: Uli Benz / TUM)

With substantial participation by a honorary professor at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, an international team of scientists has decoded the complex genome sequence of goatgrass (Aegilops tauschii), an ancestor of...[more]


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